Ideas for the Feast of St. Cecilia

Today is the Feast of St. Cecilia. She was martyred in Rome in the Third Century and is patroness of music.

It’s a good day to listen to or play sacred music, to learn a new hymn or to write one. It’s also a good idea, if you can, to attend Mass. If crafts are your thing, you might design and make a simple original instrument today. All these ideas might be great for children as well as adults.

It’s always good to pray for musicians and people working in the music industry, and for members of your church choir, particularly for their safe travels in this year’s early winter weather. Because it is November, it’s very appropriate to pray for musicians and their family members who have passed away in the past year.

I am planning to make thankfulness for the gift of music the theme for the day.

Here’s John Paul II on sacred music.

 

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The Hands that Clothe You

theraineyview:

Pray to end human trafficking. It takes many forms and goes on all over the world. It thrives on silence. Talk about it. Be aware.

Originally posted on Ms Fashion:

image

Human trafficking is so prevalent, yet hidden, in the fashion world that there’s no telling how much of what you’re wearing right now was brought to you by a victim of human trafficking.

Pray for the hands that clothe you.

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The Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Today is the Feast of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

 

When Mary was a small child, she was brought to the Temple for the purpose of education, as her mother and father had promised to do when they learned that they would be blessed with a child.
It’s a day to pray for the cloistered religious, for all their needs and intentions.

 

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Skater Monk Shows You How It’s Done

Found at Catholic Memes: Friar Gabriel exercises like this:

Beautiful, isn’t it?

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The Real War on Women, Continued: Islam, Cultural Relativism and FGM

Jaha Dukureh is an anti-FGM activist who came to America from Gambia at age 15. She was subjected to FGM as a newborn, and again at her coerced childhood “marriage” shortly after immigrating. Dukureh’s sister died from complications of the procedure.

Jaha Dukureh founded a nonprofit organization, Safe Hands for Girls, to raise awareness of the harm FGM does, so that future generations will not be put through the barbaric practice.

The horrific practice of FGM is strongly associated with Islam, though some Muslims deny any connection, but also occurs among non-Muslims living in Muslim areas or on the fringes of them. It predates Islam, though. It seems to have begun in Ancient Rome as a sign of slavery, then spread to Egypt. It now occurs in every part of the world, often in secret.

While the Western conservative and centrist voices are united against FGM, the left debates whether it’s an issue of women’s rights or one of cultural relativism, and whether opposition to the cruel practice could be construed as anti-Islamic or worse, anti-African. The Communist pundit Angela Davis and the feminist author Germaine Greer have taken the stand that FGM is a cultural expression the West misunderstands or shouldn’t meddle in, while other liberal writers point out that the little girls subjected to the practice are not freely choosing to express any culture, and it is the unconsenting girls who suffer from the injuries.

There are an estimated 125 million victims of FGM in the world today.

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Happy Veterans Day – 11-11-2014

theraineyview:

Happy Veterans’ Day. If I didn’t have to hurry off to work, I would post more, but meanwhile, enjoy this post from I Still Wonder.

Originally posted on I Still Wonder...:

US.Flagscross_Memorial.DayOn the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, an armistice went into effect and fighting ceased between the Allied Nations and Germany.  World War I was then finished.   It was called the war to end all wars.

Then in November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words:

“To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

Thus Veterans Day was born.  Happy Veterans Day to all of those amazing and brave men and women who serve our…

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Five-Dimensional Political Quiz

H/T Laura McAlister for pointing me to this political quiz. It measures in not one, not two, but five dimensions according to whomever wrote it.

Some of the questions are tricky, and I think it needs an option for “It depends on what you mean”. Examples: “Our laws should be based on our religious beliefs and values like the 10 commandments.” Based on? How closely? How literally? Religious beliefs, or values that are common in more than one religion and shared by some atheists as well? All laws are based on values. Even contract law is based on a value ascribed to honesty and reliability, which not every individual shares, yet those who don’t feel that keeping contracts is important can still be held to a contract. That’s what makes a society a society. Yet I wouldn’t support a law ordering everyone to celebrate Christmas, or to wash five times a day, or to be vegetarian. Legislating morality is the whole point of legislating anything at all, but legislating religious practices is just wrong, especially in a society bigger than a breadbox.

Likewise, “The culture of dependancy [sic] on the government has created an entire class of useless people.” Well, dependency on the government is often unnecessary and when it becomes the norm in a large community it can have tragic social consequences reaching into later generations. But no one is useless. People just have different struggles and issues. Everyone is precious and unique.

By the way, I’m a

Right-Leaning Libertarian Reactionary.

How about you?

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